Apes that Paint was a Sucess:

There are Only 4 Days until the Apes that Paint Exhibit Ends!

We would like to thank everyone who came to the show.  A very special Thank You to Community News Papers and the Carolina Ale House for helping make Apes That Paint Art Show a reality.  Last but not least we want to thank the members of the press that helped us spread the word around the world.

It was a very enjoyable night and we had great attendance.

It is time for an update:  At the end of the night, we sold 15 paintings and the day after we sold two more.   This week so far we have been in contact with people from Israel, Belgium,  Canada, Holland, UK and New Zealand.  All of them interested in purchasing art from world famous chimpanzee Bubbles.

The show will continue until July 30th, 2017 and yes there are still pieces available.  Don’t miss out.  Stop by the Frames USA & Art Gallery located at 6822 SW 40th Steet, Miami, FL 33155.  Call us at 305-666-3355 – or email us at info@framesusamiami.com.  If you are out of town and is interested in purchasing one of the paintings you can click on this link to see what we still have available.

 

Harry: Featured Orangutan Artist of the Day! #ApesthatPaint

Harry, with his beautiful long hair and round cheekpads, is a fully-flanged adult male orangutan.  Originally born in Miami at the same facility as some of the other Center for Great Apes residents, Harry is related to several orangutans.  In fact, he looks almost identical to his full brother BamBam.  BamBam is 14 months older than Harry, but Harry is much larger!

With his sweet and agreeable disposition, Harry is charming his new caregivers and has been particularly interested in watching the noisy chimpanzees nearby.  He’s eating very well and has started to explore the grounds in the aerial trailway chutes.

Harry’s background was the entertainment business in California for a few years, but most recently he lived in Central Florida.  The Center is very grateful that his owner decided to give Harry the opportunity for sanctuary care for the rest of his life.

Frames USA is hosting a Charity Art show featuring the artwork of the apes at the Center for Great Apes. Opening night is Friday, July 21, 2017, at 6 pm food and drinks provided by Carolina Ale House: RSVP

Come to the show and check out Harry’s artwork!

To RSVP click bellow:

Apes that Paint postard front

Geri: Featured Orangutan Artist of the Day! #ApesthatPaint

 

Geri started out in the entertainment industry, starring in movies such as The Flintstones, Dunston Checks In and Baby’s Day Out.  When she became too big to be worked in Hollywood, she became a breeder and had baby Jam with her mate, Sammy.  She arrived at the sanctuary when she was 15 years old and Jam arrived 4 months later.  The two were reunited after gradual introductions.  Geri spent all her time with her mate, Sammy, who was also retired at the sanctuary, until his death in 2010.  Now, Geri’s companion is Linus, but she often ventures out into the aerial chute system to visit other orangutans.

Feri is the epitome of calmness and relaxation.  She keeps very busy doing her “projects” with toys, browses, and enrichment items for hours.  She has actually organized a little play area under one of the nesting platforms in her habitat where she has stored buckets, shovels, and hats to play with.  Geri also loves to dress up in clothing given to the apes for enrichment and enjoys gardening gloves and hats.

Geri is a thoughtful problem-solver and will carefully examine something to see how it is put together (just so she can take it apart!).  She is also very tidy and enjoys buckets of soapy water to splash in and clean her toys.

Frames USA is hosting a Charity Art show featuring the artwork of the apes at the Center for Great Apes. Opening night is Friday, July 21, 2017, at 6 pm food and drinks provided by Carolina Ale House: RSVP

Come to the show and check out Geri’s artwork!

To RSVP click bellow:

Apes that Paint postard front

Chipper: Featured Chimpanzee Artist of the Day! #ApesthatPaint

Chipper was wild-born in Africa, illegally poached, sold first to a New York animal dealer, and then to a circus trainer when he was only two years old.  Along with Butch, Chipper spent ten years in the Ringling Brothers circus and then was sent to the Coulston bio-medical research lab in New Mexico when his trainer died.  After Chipper left the lab in 1985, he was sent to a small roadside zoo for retired performing circus animals in North Florida.  While there, Chipper and another chimpanzee gained some notoriety on television when they escaped, ran out onto the Interstate with a gallon of honey, and sat on the road eating their stolen treat.  After they finished the honey, they ran into a neighbor’s barn, took the cap off a tractor’s gas tank, poured kitty litter into the gas tank, then replaced the cap; then they opened the crankcase, poured in more kitty litter and put that cap back on!

Chipper arrived at the sanctuary in September 2000 with his long-time companion, Butch.  Chipper is tall and slim and can easily climb all the structures in his habitat.  His athletic abilities are evident as he plays in the swings and vines in his outside area.

Chipper’s friends and companions at the Center have been Butch, Roger, Daisy, and Angel.  Today Chipper spends most of his time with younger female Natsu.  By far, she is the most compatible with Chipper, and they play chase, tickle, and groom together most of the day.

When Chipper is out in the Walk-About Chutes, he gallops at top speed throughout the woods trying to get a game of chase going with staff and volunteers.  Chipper always wins!

Frames USA is hosting a Charity Art show featuring the artwork of the apes at the Center for Great Apes. Opening night is Friday, July 21, 2017, at 6 pm food and drinks provided by Carolina Ale House: RSVP

Come to the show and check out Chipper’s artwork!

To RSVP click bellow:

Apes that Paint postard front

Butch: Featured Chimpanzee Artist of the Day! #ApesthatPaint

 

Butch was captured as an infant in Africa in 1972 and was shipped to a dealer in New York.  He was then sold to an animal trainer and spent more than a decade performing for Ringling Brothers Circus in a group of 4 chimpanzees.  When the circus trainer died suddenly of a heart attack, Butch was sent by the trainer’s widow to the Coulston bio-medical research facility in New Mexico along with the other chimpanzees in the act (including Chipper).  They were there only a year or 2, but their medical records show that they were still sedated weekly with invasive biopsies performed on them for biomedical research.  Luckily, several animal welfare organizations secured their release from the biomed lab in 1985, and they were sent to a small roadside zoo in North Florida for unwanted circus animals.  Butch and Chipper spent 13 years there until wildlife authorities shut down the facility.

Chimpanzees in circus acts are often forced to do tricks which are unnatural to them (Butch drove a motorcycle in the circus).  In the days when Butch worked in the circus, the methods used to make these very strong primates performed were sometimes abusive and hurtful.  Most of Butch’s teeth were pulled to keep him from biting.  Jane Goodall and Dale Peterson wrote about entertainment chimpanzees (Visions of Caliban), and details about Butch and Chipper’s treatment in the circus are mentioned on page 55.

These two castrated males arrived at their permanent home at the Center for Great Apes in October 2000.  For years after Butch arrived at the sanctuary, he still had “ghosts”.  No matter what he was doing, he would frequently look back over his shoulder to see if someone was coming up behind him… even when no one was there.  Today, the Center is happy to say that Butch’s “ghosts” and memories of his sad past appear to be gone.  He is no longer frightened of things behind him and overall seems to be a relaxed and peaceful elder chimpanzee.

In November 2005, another older wild-caught chimpanzee arrived at the Center.  Marco, about 10-12 years older than Butch, had been kept alone in a backyard cage for over 30 years after his circus-performing days were over.  Marco had not seen another chimpanzee for over  35 years but was introduced to Butch a few months after he arrived at the sanctuary.  For the first 2 weeks, Butch and Marco kept their distance from each other, but suddenly one day…surprised by some visiting neighbors, they ran into each other’s arms and hugged and began intensely grooming each other.  They have been fast friends ever since that day.

Butch has a mostly toothless smile, a very long face, and a big round belly.  He likes to eat and will eagerly take every food item he’s offered.  But his favorites are fruits, carrots,  and collard greens.

Frames USA is hosting a Charity Art show featuring the artwork of the apes at the Center for Great Apes. Opening night is Friday, July 21, 2017, at 6 pm food and drinks provided by Carolina Ale House: RSVP

Come to the show and check out Butch’s artwork!

To RSVP click bellow:

Apes that Paint postard front

 

Bubbles: Featured Chimpanzee Artist of the Day! #ApesthatPaint

Bubbles was born in a Texas biomedical laboratory.  While still an infant, he was taken from his mother and sold to a Hollywood trainer, who had purchased him to be a pet chimpanzee for the world-famous pop singer Michael Jackson.  In such a bright limelight, it’s no surprise that Bubbles soon gained fame — and many adoring fans — of his own.  He appeared in TV shows, movies, and music videos.  When he was only 4 years old, he went to Japan on a promotional tour with Jackson.

A couple of years later, when Bubbles grew too strong to be around people, he was “retired” from show biz and sent to the trainer’s California animal compound in the company of an older chimpanzee named Sam.  Both Bubbles and Sam arrived at the Center for Great Apes in March 2005 with a large group of chimpanzees, all from the entertainment world.

Though Jackson bought at least two more pet chimpanzees — Max and Action Jackson (A.J.) — after Bubbles was retired, the public thought that the star still had the original “infant Bubbles” during that time.  A number of photos of Michael with either Max or A.J. are all titled “Bubbles.”  The names of his two other chimpanzees were never made public.  One of them was eventually sold to a zoo in Korea; the other was shipped to a breeding farm in Kansas.

Jackson always maintained ownership of Bubbles, his first and favorite chimpanzee, whom he treated like a son.  However, Michael did not include Bubble in his will, as some erroneous news stories have claimed.  As a result, we must continually raise funds from our supporters to provide care for Bubbles.

As an 185-pound, 4 1/2-foot adult male, Bubbles is now the dominant male in a group of chimpanzees that includes his best friend,  Ripley, adult female Oopsie, Boma, Jessie, and Kodua, and juvenile Stryker.

Bubbles does not like cameras. Even when his caregivers try to take a picture, he will turn his back if he sees a camera.  He occasionally will spit water at people when annoyed about cameras and is able to throw sand with amazing accuracy.  However, he is extremely gentle with the youngsters, especially Stryker.  In fact, when Stryker was a baby he could often be seen riding around on Bubbles’ back.

Frames USA is hosting a Charity Art show featuring the artwork of the apes at the Center for Great Apes. Opening night is Friday, July 21, 2017, at 6 pm food and drinks provided by Carolina Ale House: RSVP

Come to the show and check out Bubbles’ artwork!

To RSVP click bellow:

Apes that Paint postard front

Chuckie: Featured Orangutan Artist of the Day! #ApesthatPaint

Chuckie was born at the Memphis Zoo, but because he was a hybrid mix between Bornean and Sumatran orangutans, he was sold to a dealer and then a circus trainer.  During his years in the circus, he worked with another orangutan, Radcliffe.  Both orangutans were castrated in the circus so they never developed the large facial flanges (cheekpads), long dreads of hair or throat pouches characteristic of all male orangutans who reach sexual maturity.  After working together for five years, Radcliffe was sold to a small New York zoo and Chuckie was sent to a California trainer’s compound where he lived near chimpanzees but never another orangutan.

Chuckie was retired and sent to the sanctuary in 2006 where he was reunited with his friend, Radcliffe, who years earlier had also been retired at the sanctuary.  When they first met again, the boys played groomed each other and shared food.  It was clear that these two remembered each other and were happy to be friends again.  Because of their castration, not only their physical development affected, but their mental development as well.  The boys behave like adolescents somersaulting around their habitats, hanging upside down, making juvenile play noises, etc.  Unlike male “cheekpadders” at the Center, Chuckie and Radcliffe are always up for a good play session.

Chuckie knows how to whistle and will often whistle for attention from his caregivers.  He is a very social guy can usually be found out exploring the aerial chute system and visiting with staff and volunteers.

Frames USA is hosting a Charity Art show featuring the artwork of the apes at the Center for Great Apes. Opening night is Friday, July 21, 2017, at 6 pm food and drinks provided by Carolina Ale House: RSVP

Come to the show and check out Chuckie’s artwork!

To RSVP click bellow:

Apes that Paint postard front